As dentistry has evolved over the past decades, we have learned to identify growth problems in developing teeth, bones, and joints, allowing us to intervene earlier. In the past, orthodontics weren’t typically used until children were 12 years old, and even then, the only concern was to straighten teeth. Today, we are learning that not only can we move teeth with orthodontics; we can influence the bone and facial structure development. We can widen a palate, move

Today, we are learning that not only can we move teeth with orthodontics; we can influence the bone and facial structure development. We can widen a palate, move bone, and correct other developmental concerns with orthodontics, and if we can do this earlier in our patients’ lives, we can prevent issues from cropping up in the future.

Through my own training in TMJ, I have an appreciation for the developing airway as well as in teeth, bones, and joints. Very small lower jaws and tiny chins, a chin slightly off center, or an underdeveloped palate can effect airway development. Since this often leads to breathing issues like snoring and sleep apnea, by identifying and treating these concerns early, we can prevent these issues causing health concerns later in life.